GST: FAQs Series 4

Levy of and Exemption from Tax


Q 1. Where is the power to levy GST derived from?

Ans. Article 246A of the Constitution, which was introduced by the Constitution (101st Amendment) Act, 2016 confers concurrent powers to both, Parliament and State Legislatures to make laws with respect to GST i. e. central tax (CGST) and state tax (SGST) or union territory tax (UTGST).

However, clause 2 of Article 246A read with Article 269A provides exclusive power to the Parliament to legislate with respect to inter-State trade or commerce i.e. integrated tax (IGST).


Q 2. What is the taxable event under GST?

Ans. Taxable event under GST is supply of goods or services or both. CGST and SGST/ UTGST will be levied on intra-State supplies. IGST will be levied on inter-State supplies.

Q 3. Whether supplies made without consideration will also come within the purview of supply under GST?

Ans. Yes, but only those activities which are specified in Schedule I to the CGST Act / SGST Act. The said provision has been adopted in IGST Act as well as in UTGST Act also.


Q 4. Will giving away essential commodities by a charitable institution be taxable activity?

Ans. In order to be a supply which is taxable under GST, the transaction should be in the course or furtherance of business. As there is no quid pro quo involved in supply for charitable activities, it is not a supply under GST.


Q 5. Who can notify a transaction to be supply of goods or services?

Ans. Central Government or State Government, on the recommendations of the GST Council, can notify an activity to be the supply of goods and not supply of services or supply of services and not supply of goods or neither a supply of goods nor a supply of services.


Q 6. What are composite supply and mixed supply? How are these two different from each other?

Ans. Composite supply is a supply consisting of two or more taxable supplies of goods or services or both or any combination thereof, which are bundled in natural course and are supplied in conjunction with each other in the ordinary course of business and where one of which is a principal supply. For example, when a consumer buys a television set and he also gets warranty and a maintenance contract with the TV, this supply is a composite supply. In this example, supply of TV is the principal supply, warranty and maintenance service are ancillary.

Mixed supply is combination of more than one individual supplies of goods or services or any combination thereof made in conjunction with each other for a single price, which can ordinarily be supplied separately. For example, a shopkeeper selling storage water bottles along with refrigerator. Bottles and the refrigerator can easily be priced and sold separately.

Q 7. What is the treatment of composite supply and mixed supply under GST?

Ans. Composite supply shall be treated as supply of the principal supply. Mixed supply would be treated as supply of that particular goods or services which attracts the highest rate of tax.


Q 8. Are all goods and services taxable under GST?

Ans. Supplies of all goods and services are taxable except alcoholic liquor for human consumption. Supply of petroleum crude, high speed diesel, motor spirit (commonly known as petrol), natural gas and aviation turbine fuel shall be taxable with effect from a future date. This date would be notified by the Government on the recommendations of the GST Council.

Q 9. What is meant by Reverse Charge?

Ans. It means the liability to pay tax is on the recipient of supply of goods and services instead of the supplier of such goods or services in respect of notified categories of supply.

Q 10. Is the reverse charge mechanism applicable only to services?

Ans. No, reverse charge applies to supplies of both goods and services, as notified by the Government on the recommendations of the GST Council.

Disclaimer:

This FAQ on GST compiled by NACEN and vetted by the Source Trainers is based on the CGST/SGST/UTGST/IGSTAct(s). This FAQ is for training and academic purposes only.

The information in this blogger is reproduced from FAQ on GST publised by CBEC updated on 31 March 2017 and is not intended to be treated as legal ad vice or opinion. For greater details, you are requested to refer to the respective CGST/SGST/UTGST/IGST Acts.

The FAQs refer to CGST and SGST Acts as CGST/SGST as CGST Act and SGST Act are identical in most of the provisions. CGST Act has been introduced in the Parliament. The SGST Acts will be passed by respective state legislatures. A few provisions may be specific to state and may not be in CGST Act.

Published by Business So Simple

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